A Wonder Woman – Renaissance Garb Crossover

Jenn at Ms. Makes mashed up Wonder Woman and Renaissance garb with brilliant results:

Instagram Msjennmakes Wonder Woman Renaissance Full
Ms. Jenn Makes on Instagram; photo by Angela (wanderings_in_wonderland).
Instagram Msjennmakes Wonder Woman Renaissance Portrait
Ms. Jenn Makes on Instagram; photo by Angela (wanderings_in_wonderland).

 

It’s a version of late fifteenth century Florentine dress. Jenn describes the details:

“The outfit is based on those common in 1490’s Florence, largely documented by Domenico Ghirlandaio, and consists of a camicia, side lacing gamurra (with bead and sequin embellished neckline decoration), a set of tie on sleeves (also embellished), a velvet giornea, and a #tambourbeading embellished and faux leather belt! Other accessories include a lasso holder, faux hair braid, and a diadem […]”

 

She also shared some details of the costume, like the beaded collar piece

Instagram Msjennmakes Wonder Woman Renaissance Neck Beading
Ms. Jenn Makes on Instagram.

…and detachable sleeves, lined, with another set of embellishments from Wonder Woman’s costume:

Instagram Msjennmakes Wonder Woman Renaissance Sleeves
Ms. Jenn Makes on Instagram.

 

Absolutely breathtaking! Jenn mentions using a beading technique called tambour beading, which I hadn’t heard of before. I just love learning new things from my fellow textile geeks!

Visit Jenn’s Instagram for more views and details or the Ms. Makes website for more sewing talk and tips.

Crossposted from the Playfully Grownup Home blog.

Images from Instagram: full view and portrait by Angela (wanderings_in_wonderland) via Ms. Jenn Makes. Collar detail and sleeves by Ms. Jenn Makes.

In Making Stuff occasional feature, we share fun arts and crafts done by us and our fellow geeks and nerds.

Advertisements

Jyn Erso’s Crystal Necklace DIY-ed

It’s a little over a month since Rogue One came out, and my head’s still firmly in the Star Wars universe. I was therefore delighted to run into this version of Jyn Erso’s crystal necklace:

Jenuine Mom jyn-erso-kyber-crystal-necklace-finis3-768x1225
Jennifer Marx at Jenuine Mom

It’s made by Jennifer Marx at Jenuine Mom – isn’t it great?

I don’t remember there being any gold at the top of Jyn’s crystal, though – an excuse to see Rogue One again, oh boy! 🙂 Nevertheless, this version looks elegant enough to wear every day, not just for cosplay or fan events.

Check out Jennifer’s tutorial for more!

In Making Stuff occasional feature, we share fun arts and crafts done by us and our fellow geeks and nerds.

Cosplaying Hercules

Heracles on a black-figure pot, photograph by Jastrow via Wikimedia (Currently Louvre; c. 520 BCE; pottery)
Heracles on a black-figure pot, photograph by Jastrow via Wikimedia (Currently Louvre; c. 520 BCE; pottery)

Cosplay may seem like a recent invention, but the ancient Greeks and Romans weren’t above dressing up like their favorite heroes. The Greek hero Heracles (better known to us by his Roman name “Hercules”) was easily recognizable with his lion-skin cloak and rough wooden club. While we don’t know that anyone actually did walk around dressed up like Heracles, a few works of art show that Greeks and Romans certainly imagined doing so.

One example is theatrical, from Aristophanes’ comedy The Frogs. The play is about Dionysus getting fed up with the contemporary theatre and deciding to go down to Hades to bring back one of the great tragic playwrights from the past. Being a bit of a coward, Dionysus dresses up like the brave Heracles by putting a lion skin over his luxurious yellow robe and carrying a club while wearing an actor’s high boots, just to keep his spirits up. For extra comedy, Dionysus, dressed as Heracles, goes to visit the actual Heracles at the start of the play for advice on his adventure. Here’s what happens when Dionysus, accompanied by his smart-ass slave Xanthias, knocks on the hero’s door:

Heracles: Who banged the door? Someone pounded it like a centaur. Tell me who it is. (He opens the door and falls over laughing.)

Dionysus: I say, Xanthias!

Xanthais: What is it?

Dionysus: Didn’t you notice?

Xanthias: Huh? What?

Dionysus: How afraid I made him!

Xanthias: Afraid you’ve gone mad, more like!

Heracles: Oh, by Demeter, I can’t stop laughing! I’ll bite my tongue, but still I can’t help it!

Dionysus: Oh, pull yourself together. I’ve got something to ask you.

Heracles: I can’t stifle this laughter, though, at the sight of that lion skin over your saffron gown. Whose idea was this, the club and the high heels at once?

Aristophanes, The Frogs 38-46

(My own translation)

161208commodus
Commodus as Hercules, photograph by Sailko via Wikimedia (Currently Musei Capitolini, Rome; late 2nd c. CE; marble)

Over in the Roman world, the emperor Commodus decided he was not content with traditional portrait sculptures and had himself portrayed dressed up as Hercules. Here he is wearing the lion skin, carrying the club in one hand and the apples of the Hesperides (from one of the hero’s twelve labors) in the other. For an emperor who was obsessed with his public image, adopting the guise of a popular hero like Hercules made sense.

Just like we can recognize our modern heroes by their symbols and distinguishing attributes—an S on the chest and a curl of hair for Superman, a bow and a mockingjay pin for Katniss Everdeen—people of the past knew their heroes in the same way.

In Character is an occasional feature looking at some of our favorite characters from written works and media to see what drives them, what makes them work, and what makes us love them so much.

These Star Wars Group Costumes Are Awesome

Liz Stanley at Say Yes shared a Star Wars style, easy-on-the-wallet (and nerves) approach to Halloween costumes:

Star Wars group costumes. Photo by Ashley Thalman / Say Yes.
Star Wars group costumes. Photo by Ashley Thalman / Say Yes.

Perfect for Halloween: evocative outfits that are easy to create almost entirely by using everyday items. Sometimes it’s the whole that matters more than individual details. Great job!

Credits: models Aaron, Kayti and little Monroe Oldham; photography by Ashley Thalman; styling by Sarah Larsen; production by site manager Ashley Aikele; creative direction by Liz Stanley at Say Yes.

Crossposted from the Playfully Grownup Home blog.

In Making Stuff occasional feature, we share fun arts and crafts done by us and our fellow geeks and nerds.

A Couple of Minions in the Metro

A few months old now, but so great: this cosplaying dad on the way to the movies with his son, both decked out as Minions, deserves a hooray:

Reddit User Boba_F37T on Imgur
Reddit User Boba_F37T on Imgur

Such an easy look to put together: overalls, yellow t-shirt and bag, plus commercially available Minions goggles that won’t break the bank. Making memories doesn’t have to involve grand gestures!

In Making Stuff occasional feature, we share fun arts and crafts done by us and our fellow geeks and nerds.