Quotes: If Anyone Hated Me and I Hated Them

As you may know, speakers of Modern English are struggling to find a non-clunky and commonly accepted gender-neutral third person singular pronoun to replace the generic use of he or she.

The issue’s been periodically debated for decades, really, but lately the calls seem to have gained more urgency. There are many contenders, among them e / em / eir and ze / hir / hir.

Singular they may be gaining some ground, or at least growing in popularity here in the U.S. I’ve seen references to a long history of using they in that manner, but these references usually give no examples. (Maybe I just haven’t been reading the better articles? Also, one sometimes wonders why the British use of one has fallen out in other world Englishes.)

In any case, as an Anglo-Saxonist, it’s beyond my era and/or expertise. Nevertheless, I’m curious about any early examples. Here’s the oldest I’ve noticed so far, from a 1938 Hercule Poirot novel:

“Pilar said gravely: ‘If I had an enemy—if anyone hated me and I hated them—then I would cut my enemy’s throat like this….’”

– Agatha Christie: Hercule Poirot’s Christmas, p. 18 (original emphasis)

This example is great, because it’s clear and unquestionable. I’m pretty sure there are a few singular theys in Jane Austen’s novels, but I can’t remember where. Maybe it’s the perfect time for a re-read. 🙂

Christie, Agatha. Hercule Poirot’s Christmas. New York, NY: Black Dog & Leventhal, 1938.

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Quotes: I Only Regret […] Making My Detective a Finn

Christie Cards on the Table Excerpt

“[…] I only regret one thing—making my detective a Finn. I don’t really know anything about Finns and I’m always getting letters from Finland pointing out something impossible that he’s said or done. They seem to read detective stories a good deal in Finland. I suppose it’s the long winters with no daylight.”

– author Mrs. Oliver in Agatha Christie’s Cards on the Table

This excerpt comes from a Hercule Poirot novel. It’s a page-long burst by an imaginary author who doesn’t really care about getting certain details wrong, for example when one would use a dictograph vs. phonograph. That, of course, leads to feedback from more knowledgeable readers.

Being a Finn, I guffawed! Finns are busy readers indeed these days; it may already have been the case back in the 1930s as well.

(But, good grief, way to insult Romanians and Bulgarians, Christie! There’s a lot of interest in Christie’s writing, but on the other hand a lot of it hasn’t aged well, especially the racism and bigotry.)

Christie, Agatha. Cards on the Table. New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers, 2011 [1936], p. 66.

Image by Eppu Jensen

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Quotes: Declining to Get Thrilled

From an early Hercule Poirot mystery comes this hilarious quote:

“[…] said Inspector Davis. ‘There’s not going to be much mystery about this crime. Take a look at the hilt of that dagger.’

“I took the look.

“’I dare say they’re not apparent to you, but I can see them clearly enough.’ He lowered his voice. ‘Fingerprints!’

“He stood off a few steps to judge of his effect.

“’Yes,’ I said midly. ‘I guessed that.’

“I do not see why I should be supposed to be totally devoid of intelligence. After all, I read detective stories, and the newspapers, and am a man of quite average ability. If there had been toe marks on the dagger handle, now, that would have been quite a different thing. I would then have registered any amount of surprise and awe.

“I think the inspector was annoyed with me for declining to get thrilled.”

– Doctor Sheppard in The Murder of Roger Ackroyd by Agatha Christie

I’m reading Agatha Christie in English for the first time, and it’s a hoot! Not only are her mysteries top notch, her language is a delight. My (admittely hazy) memories don’t measure up to what I’m seeing now; I don’t know whether it just didn’t translate well or whether I was too young to understand. I’m discovering so much dry humor to irony to outright satire that I’m pretty much snickering my way through the novels.

Christie, Agatha. The Murder of Roger Ackroyd. New York, NY: Black Dog & Leventhal, [2006, orig. published 1926], p. 73.

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